Neuer ACCORD-Bericht zu China

ACCORD veröffentlicht einen neuen Länderbericht zu China.

Der 356-seitige Länderbericht von ACCORD zu China, von UNHCR in Auftrag gegeben, ist in englischer Sprache unter folgendem Link verfügbar:

ACCORD: China: COI Compilation, März 2014
http://www.ecoi.net/file_upload/90_1396338234_accord-2014-03-china.pdf

Das Inhaltsverzeichnis des Berichts:

1 Background information
1.1 Geographical information
1.1.1 Map of China
1.1.2 Map of Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR)
1.1.3 Map of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR)
1.2 Brief overview of political institutions and structures 7
1.2.1 Government structure
1.2.2 Communist Party of China (CPC)
1.2.3 Other recognized political parties
1.3 Brief overview of socio-economic situation
2 Main political developments
2.1 Electoral framework
2.2 2011-12 Local People’s Congress elections
2.3 CPC party congress
2.4 March 2013 presidential appointment by the NPC
3 Rule of law and the administration of justice
3.1 Law enforcement, intelligence and armed forces
3.1.1 Law enforcement
3.1.2 Intelligence
3.1.3 Armed forces
3.2 Overview of Chinese judicial system
3.2.1 Courts and prosecution system
3.2.2 Independence of judiciary
3.3 Criminal justice
3.4 Arbitrary arrest/detention and enforced disappearances
3.4.1 Enforced disappearances of political activists’ family members
3.5 Unfair trial of political dissidents
3.6 Unlawful or disproportionate punishment for crimes
3.7 Death penalty
3.8 Types of detention
3.8.1 Criminal detention
3.8.2 Administrative detention
3.8.3 Mental institutions
3.8.4 House arrest (“soft detention”, ruanjin)
3.8.5 “Black jails”
3.8.6 Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) prisons
4 Freedom of expression, association and assembly
4.1 Political opposition
4.1.1 Banned political parties
4.1.2 Independent candidates
4.2 Anti-corruption activists
4.3 Human rights defenders
4.4 Lawyers
4.5 Petitioners
5 Freedom of the media
5.1 Control of the internet and the media; censorship
5.2 Treatment of critical journalists, citizen journalists, bloggers, etc.
6 Freedom of movement
6.1 Freedom of residence
6.1.1 The hukou system
6.1.2 Land disputes
6.2 Freedom of movement in-country
7 Freedom of conscience and freedom of religion
7.1 Registration
7.2 Religious demography
7.3 Treatment of religious/spiritual groups
7.3.1 Buddhism
7.3.2 Islam
7.3.3 Christianity
7.3.4 Taoism
7.3.5 Shamanism
7.3.6 Dongba religion
7.3.7 Falun Gong
7.3.8 Family members of religious groups’ members
8 Treatment of minority ethnic groups
8.1 Hui (also Hwei or Huihui)
8.2 North Koreans
8.2.1 Children with one North Korean parent
8.2.2 Persons who assist North Koreans
8.3 Uyghur (also Uygur, Uighur or Weiwu’er)
8.3.1 Uighur-Han clashes
8.3.2 Clashes with security forces
8.3.3 Separatist movements/terrorist groups
8.4 Mongolians (also Mongols)
8.5 Tibetans
8.5.1 Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR): relocation/re-housing policy and “Grid system”
8.5.2 Students’ demonstrations of November 2012
8.6 Kazakh
9 Treatment of women
9.1 Family planning/one-child policy
9.2 Trafficking in women
9.3 Sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV)
10 Treatment of children
10.1 Hei haizi (black children)
10.2 Child labour and street children
10.3 Orphans and adoption
11 Treatment of LGBTI persons
11.1 Legal framework
11.2 Treatment by the state and society
12 Treatment of persons with disabilities
12.1 Legal framework
12.2 Treatment by the state and society
13 Treatment of persons living with HIV/AIDS
13.1 Legal framework
13.2 Treatment by the state and society
14 Monitoring of Chinese asylum-seekers abroad and treatment of failed asylum seekers upon return
14.1 Exit
14.1.1 Travel routes
14.1.2 Surveillance abroad
14.2 Treatment upon return

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