Information on regions where the People's Revolutionary Army (Ejército Popular Revolucionario - EPR) is located and the actions taken by the Mexican government regarding the EPR [MEX28282.FE]

According to several sources, the People's Revolutionary Army (Ejército Popular Revolucionario - EPR) operates mainly in the poor Mexican states in the south: Guerrero, Oaxaca, Veracruz and Chiapas (AI 1997, 229; AP, 8 Sept. 1997; Dallas Morning News, 19 Jan. 1997; IPS 6 Aug. 1997; Washington Post 4 June 1997). However, these sources do not identify the Mexican states where there is no EPR presence (ibid.). Latin America Regional Reports: Mexico & NAFTA Report of 16 September 1997 points out that the EPR is present and especially active in the State of Guerrero.

Amnesty International states that the Mexican government had allegedly launched an offensive in the states of Guerrero, Oaxaca and Veracruz to counter attacks by the EPR (1997, 229). Human Rights Watch states that the government had allegedly imposed stricter control measures on the social organizations in the regions where the EPR is located (1997, 113).

According to an article in the New York Times of 13 February 1997, the government had apparently imprisoned and charged 85 people for collaborating with the EPR.

The three documents attached provide information on the EPR's activities in Guerrero State, including confrontations with the army and action taken by the government against the EPR (Excelsior 25 May 1997; Latin America Regional Reports: Mexico & NAFTA 8 July 1997; Latin American Weekly Report 3 June 1997).

For further information on the EPR in Guerrero State, please consult Response to Information Request MEX26259.E of 21 February 1997. Also see Response to Information Request MEX26191.E of 24 February 1997 for information on the EPR's activities in Veracruz State. Also, please consult the May 1997 document in the Questions and Answers Series entitled Mexico: Armed Rebel Groups.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References


Amnesty International. 1997. Amnesty International Report 1997. New York : Amnesty International USA.

The Associated Press (AP). 8 September 1997. Trina Kleist. "AP Photos SCC101, 103, 104." (NEXIS)

The Dallas Morning News. 19 January 1997. Laurence Iliff. "Despite Lack of Action, Mexican Rebel Group Seems to be Intact." (NEXIS)

Excelsior [Mexico]. 25 May 1997. Rafael Rodríguez and Enrique Diaz. "EPR Rebels Ambush Military Convoy, 4 Dead." (Mexico NewsPak [Austin], 19 May-1 June 1997, Vol. 5, No. 8)

Human Rights Watch (HRW). 1997. Human Rights World Report 1997. New York: Human Rights Watch.

InterPress Service (IPS). 6 August 1997. Diego Cevallos. "Mexico-Human Rights : Special Rapporteur on Torture Sent to Mexico." (NEXIS)

Latin America Regional Reports : Mexico & NAFTA Report [London]. 16 September 1997. "Another Stunt and Another Attempt at Politics: EPR."

_____. 8 July 1997. "Guerrero: EPR Threats."

Latin America Weekly Report [London]. 3 June 1997. "Guerrero Becomes a War Zone."

New York Times. 13 February 1997. Julia Preston. "Rebels in Mexico Fight On, Nonviolently." (Mexico NewsPak [Austin], 10 Feb.-23 Feb. 1997, Vol. 5, No. 1)

The Washington Post. 4 June 1997. Molly Moore. "After 68 Years the Party Is Over." (NEXIS)

Attachments


Excelsior [Mexico]. 25 May 1997. Rafael Rodríguez et Enrique Diaz. "EPR Rebels Ambush Military Convoy, 4 Dead." (Mexico NewsPak [Austin], 19 May-1 June 1997, Vol. 5, No. 8, p. 2)

Latin America Regional Reports: Mexico & NAFTA Report [London]. 8 July 1997. "Guerrero: EPR Threats."

Latin America Weekly Report [London]. 3 June 1997. "Guerrero Becomes a War Zone."