Source description last updated: 2 December 2019

In brief: Conciliation Resources (CR) is a London-based international non-governmental organisation that aims to end violent conflict and create more peaceful societies

Coverage on ecoi.net:

Accord series, Reports, Policy Briefs and other reports

Covered quarterly on ecoi.net, for countries of priorities A, B and C.

Mission/Mandate/Objectives:

“Our vision is to transform the way the world resolves violent conflict so that people work together to build peaceful and inclusive societies. […] Our purpose is to bring people together to find creative and sustainable paths to peace.” (CR: Our goals and values, undated)

“One of the fundamental aspects of our work is identifying and addressing the various underlying factors which lead to violence.” (CR: Annual Report 2018, June 2019, p. 6)

CR has published reports, films, blog posts and articles which have “highlighted learning, expert opinion and case studies to show how policymakers and others can improve their responses to conflict” (CR: Annual Report 2018, June 2019, p. 7)

“We work alongside people affected by conflict – […] basing our research and policy recommendations on their views and insights.” The “Accord publication series takes an in-depth look at specific peacebuilding themes and conflicts, sharing lessons from peacebuilding to strengthen peace processes.” (CR: Annual Report 2018, June 2019, p. 32)

CR counts over 60 staff members and works with more than 70 partners across the world (CR: Our history, undated).

Funding:

CR is funded through contributions from governments, multilateral organisations, trusts, foundations (CR: Our funding partners, undated) and individuals (CR: Funding and finance, undated), including the UN Peacebuilding Fund, the European Commission, the foreign ministries of Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, the UK Department for International Development (DFID), the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), the Peace Nexus Fund and the National Endowment for Democracy (CR: Our funding partners, undated).

Scope of reporting:

Geographic focus: East and Central Africa, Horn of Africa, Latin America, South Asia, Southeast Asia, West Africa, Pacific (CR: Our history, undated)

Thematic focus: peacebuilding, mediation, dialogue, engaging armed groups, dealing with the past, inclusion (CR: What we focus on, undated)

Methodology:

Articles or reports published as part of the Accord series are written by external researchers who may be academics based in Western universities (see, for example, Meehan, Patrick: Peacebuilding amidst war in northern Myanmar. In: CR: Borderlands and peacebuilding; A view from the margins, November 2018, p. 34) or researchers/academics who live and work in the region (see, for example, Thapa, Deepak: Negotiating a ‘New Nepal’; Evolving relationship between inclusion and peace. In: CR: Navigating inclusion, March 2019, p. 66). Some contributions are co-authored by Western and locally-based researchers (see, for example, Goodhand, Jonathan / Walton, Oliver / Karn, Sujeet / Jha, Kalpana: Madhesi borderland brokers and Nepal’s post-war transition. In: CR: Borderlands and peacebuilding; A view from the margins, November 2018, p. 48).

The Accord series provides analysis based on the author’s knowledge of the topic and may, amongst others, draw on surveys conducted by the author/his or her organisation (see, for example, Abdel Baky, Mariam: Peacebuilding in Tunisian border regions: a missing piece of the transition process. In: CR: Borderlands and peacebuilding; A view from the margins, November 2018, pp. 59-61) or render individual narratives of local actors (see, for example, Goodhand, Jonathan / Walton, Oliver / Karn, Sujeet / Jha, Kalpana: Madhesi borderland brokers and Nepal’s post-war transition. In: CR: Borderlands and peacebuilding; A view from the margins, November 2018, pp. 52-54). These contributions often do not contain footnotes or references in the text body (see, for example, Thapa, Deepak: Negotiating a ‘New Nepal’; Evolving relationship between inclusion and peace. In: CR: Navigating inclusion, March 2019, pp. 61-66 and Abdel Baky, Mariam: Peacebuilding in Tunisian border regions: a missing piece of the transition process. In: CR (ed.): Borderlands and peacebuilding; A view from the margins, November 2018, pp. 56-63) but each Accord series report does include a list of references or further readings at the end (see, for example, CR: Navigating inclusion in peace processes, March 2019, pp. 103-106 and CR: Borderlands and peacebuilding; A view from the margins, November 2018, pp. 78-80).

CR’s Reports may be authored and researched external researchers (see, for example, CR: Youth perspectives on peace and security: Afghanistan (author: Noah Coburn), April 2018) or by written by CR based on research conducted by its local partners (see, for example, CR: Youth perspectives on peace and security: the Georgian-Abkhaz context, April 2018). They may present findings from focus group discussions involving people affected by conflict (see, for example, CR: Youth perspectives on peace and security: Afghanistan (author: Noah Coburn), April 2018 and CR: Youth perspectives on peace and security: the Georgian-Abkhaz context, April 2018).

Policy Briefs are written by CR and based on participatory research conducted by local partners that may include focus-group discussions, semi-structured interviews (CR: Unable to stay in place: Women’s participation in land tenure and security in the Democratic Republic of Congo, November 2017, p. 3 and CR: Underlying tensions: South Sudanese refugees and pathways to conflict prevention in the Democratic Republic of Congo, November 2017, p. 2), surveys (see, for example, CR: Underlying tensions: South Sudanese refugees and pathways to conflict prevention in the Democratic Republic of Congo, November 2017, p. 2) or workshops with local informants (CR: Unable to stay in place: Women’s participation in land tenure and security in the Democratic Republic of Congo, November 2017, p. 3 and CR: Fighting sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV): rape as an issue in South Sudan, March 2019).

Languages of publication:

English and relevant local languages including Arabic, French, Russian or Spanish

 

All links accessed 02 December 2019.