Child Soldiers International (formerly: Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers)
http://www.child-soldiers.org/home
Source description last updated: 10. November 2011.
Mission/Mandate:
Child Soldiers International (CSI) was founded as “Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers” (CSI website, http://www.child-soldiers.org/csi/child_soldiers_international, accessed 10 November 2011) by the following NGOs:
„Amnesty International, Defence for Children International, Human Rights Watch, International Federation Terre des Hommes, International Save the Children Alliance, Jesuit Refugee Service, the Quaker United Nations Office-Geneva and World Vision International.“ (HRW: Worldwide Use of Child Soldiers Continues Unabated, 15. Jänner 2004, http://www.hrw.org/en/news/2004/01/15/worldwide-use-child-soldiers-continues-unabated, accessed 10 November 2011)
“In 2011 it was decided to move from a structure based on a Coalition of NGOs to an independent NGO working on child soldier issues and the name, Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, was changed to Child Soldiers International.” (CSI website, http://www.child-soldiers.org/csi/reports-and-accounts, accessed 10 November 2011)
“CSI promotes global adherence to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict with a minimum age of 18 for voluntary recruitment. It seeks to end all forms of military recruitment of children or the use in hostilities in any capacity of any person under the age of 18 by state armed forces or non-state armed groups, as well as other human rights abuses resulting from their recruitment or use. It advocates the release of unlawfully recruited children; promotes their successful reintegration into civilian life; and calls for accountability for those who recruit or use them.” (CSI website, http://www.child-soldiers.org/csi/child_soldiers_international, accessed 10 November 2011)
Target group:
Governmental Agencies, NGOs, other stakeholders and the general public
Objective:
“CSI now works for the effective implementation of the Optional Protocol to the (UN) Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict (OPAC); a global ban on any form of military recruitment of people below the age of 18 years; and a definitive end to the military us of children in any capacity.
Through research and advocacy, nationally and internationally, CSI works to end all forms of military recruitment and use in hostilities of persons below the age of 18 years.” (CSI website, http://www.child-soldiers.org/csi/child_soldiers_international, accessed 10 November 2011)
Funding:
In the fiscal year ending with 31 March 2011, CSI was funded by four national governments and three grant making organizations, as well as by small donations from individuals and groups. Expenditure for the year was 713,643.- GBP (CSI: Directors‘ Report and Financial Statements – 1 April 2010 to 31 March 211, p.5, http://www.child-soldiers.org/Child_Soldiers_International_%28formerly_Coalition_to_Stop_the_Use_of_Child_Soldiers%29_2010_11_signed_accounts.pdf, accessed 10 November 2011)
Scope of reporting:
Geographic focus: Worldwide
Thematic focus: Child Soldiers
Reporting methodology and Publication cycle:
“We produce the Child Soldiers Global Report every three years, providing detailed country-by-country information on the recruitment and use of children in armed conflict by government forces, government-backed paramilitaries and armed political groups, as well as information on demobilization and reintegration programs where these exist.
We regularly submit briefing papers and country information to the UN Security Council, usually in advance of the council's annual debate on the involvement of children in armed conflict. We also submit country information to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child which monitors governments' progress in implementing the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Documents and other briefing materials are also submitted to regional bodies such as the European Union when relevant.
We commission and carry out research on child soldier use in particular regions or countries. […]
We have also researched and published general articles on the context, causes and consequences of child soldiering. Topics have included displacement, girl soldiers and sexual exploitation, juvenile justice for child soldiers accused of human rights violations and release and reintegration.” (CSI website, http://www.child-soldiers.org/csi/what-we-do, accessed 10 November 2011)
Child Soldiers Global Report: Information is sought from a wide range of sources: governments, UN agencies and peacekeeping missions, other intergovernmental organizations, news media, academic sources, human rights and humanitarian organizations. Information was also provided by Coalition members and partners and by local non-governmental organizations, journalists, lawyers and activists. In some cases the identity of the source has been withheld (this is indicated in endnotes). The report covers the period from April 2004 to October 2007. (Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers: Child Soldiers Global Report 2008, 2008, S.410, http://www.childsoldiersglobalreport.org/files/country_pdfs/FINAL_2008_Global_Report.pdf, accessed on 5 December 2008)
Languages:
English, some reports also available in Spanish, French, Arabic, etc.
Navigation of website:
Home > Regions > select country
Additional references:
Charity Commission (UK): 1095237 - CHILD SOLDIERS INTERNATIONAL – Charity Overview
http://www.charity-commission.gov.uk/SHOWCHARITY/RegisterOfCharities/CharityWithPartB.aspx?RegisteredCharityNumber=1095237&SubsidiaryNumber=0 (accessed 10 November 2011)
CSI: Directors‘ Report and Financial Statements – 1 April 2010 to 31 March 211, http://www.child-soldiers.org/Child_Soldiers_International_%28formerly_Coalition_to_Stop_the_Use_of_Child_Soldiers%29_2010_11_signed_accounts.pdf (accessed 10 November 2011)
Homepage:
http://www.child-soldiers.org/
Search:
All documents available on ecoi.net from this source