Jordan: Whether the Jordanian Civil Status and Passports Department issues letters detailing an individual's citizenship status in Jordan; information on the requirements and procedures to obtain such a document, including by a third party and from abroad (2013-November 2016) [JOR105674.E]

Research Directorate, Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Ottawa

1. Citizenship Status Letters

In correspondence with the Research Directorate, an associate from an Amman-based law office with experience in citizenship and immigration law stated that, according to information she obtained from the Jordanian Civil Status and Passports (CSP) Department for this Response, the CSP Department only identity documents, such as passports or identity cards, are issued to indicate the citizenship of the person who is a Jordanian citizen (Associate 6 Nov. 2016). The same source added that if a person is not a Jordanian citizen, a letter indicating citizenship status can be issued, if a letter is requested by a court or a "competent authority" such as the Social Security Corporation [1] (ibid.). In this case the CSP Department will issue a letter addressed to the requesting authority or court indicating that the person does not have Jordanian citizenship (ibid.). In follow-up correspondence, the Associate explained that "competent authorities" refer to "any person or organization that has the legally delegated or invested authority, capacity, or power to perform a designated function," which in Jordan includes but is not limited to governmental and "semi-governmental" entities, Ministries, Ministers, departments, municipalities and "any judicial and semi-judicial authority" (ibid. 20 Nov. 2016).

In correspondence with the Research Directorate, a partner from a law office in Amman that practices various types of law, in particular with respect to nationality, whose office also enquired with the CSP Department to obtain information for this Response, similarly indicated that the Legal Department at the CSP Department issues "official 'to whom it may concern' letters that state a person's citizenship status in Jordan (Partner 6 Nov. 2016). The same source stated that for Jordanian citizens, such letter indicates that a person holds Jordanian citizenship (ibid.). However, the same source further explained that for non-Jordanians, such letter would indicate that "'no records regarding the person in question are kept with the CSP Department' which in Arabic would amount to a simple [statement that this person is] 'free of any records'" (ibid. 14 Nov. 2016). According to the same source, the letters are customarily stamped by the CSP Department and are considered official government letters (ibid. 6 Nov. 2016). Corroborating information could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate within the time constraints of this Response.

2. Procedures to Obtain a Letter of Citizenship Status

The Associate indicated that citizenship status letters are issued on a "case by case" basis, and only when they are requested by a competent authority or a court (Associate 6 Nov. 2016). The same source further indicated that such letters cannot be requested through a representative, but "[i]f a court order is issued from abroad requesting the status of an individual in Jordan, the [CSP Department] may respond to that request provided that all legalization[s] and certification[s] of the foreign court order are being made" (ibid.).

However, the Partner stated that letters regarding a person's citizenship status are issued based on an application made to the CSP Department, and cost approximately 1 Jordanian dinar [C$1.90] (Partner 6 Nov. 2016). The same source indicated that, from within Jordan, both Jordanian and non-Jordanian citizens can obtain a letter of citizenship status by applying to the CSP department (ibid.). The same source noted that Jordanian citizens need to attach a copy of their national ID card to the application, while non-Jordanian citizens need to attach a copy of their passport (ibid.). The source stated that applications can also be made by a representative on an applicant's behalf, on the condition that "a representation letter certified by a bank" is submitted with the application (ibid.).

The Partner added that, outside of Jordan, Jordanian Embassies issue letters regarding citizenship status, and that to obtain one, a request must be made to the relevant Jordanian Embassy, which will provide the necessary instructions on procedures and documents required for the specific case (ibid.). According to the same source, alternatively, a letter on citizenship status may be obtained from abroad through the use of a representative in Jordan (ibid.). The same source added that in the case of use of a representative from abroad, the representation letter certified by a bank and the copy of the applicant's passport accompanying the application need to be certified by the Jordanian Embassy and the Jordanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Expatriates (ibid.). Corroborating information could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate within the time constraints of this Response.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim for refugee protection. Please find below the list of sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

Note

[1] According to the e-government website of the government of Jordan, the Social Security Corporation implements social security insurance programs in Jordan, including insurance against work-related injuries and illnesses, and old age, disability and death insurance (Jordan n.d.).

References

Associate, Rajai K. W. Dajani & Associates. 20 November 2016. Correspondence with the Research Directorate.

Associate, Rajai K. W. Dajani & Associates. 6 November 2016. Correspondence with the Research Directorate.

Jordan. N.d. Jordan e-Government Portal. "Social Security Corporation." [Accessed 10 Nov. 2016]

Partner, Obeidat & Freihat. 14 November 2016. Correspondence with the Research Directorate.

Partner, Obeidat & Freihat. 6 November 2016. Correspondence with the Research Directorate.

Additional Sources Consulted

Oral sources: ARDD-Legal Aid; Jordan – Civil Status and Passport Department, Embassy in Ottawa.

Internet sites, including: ecoi.net; Factiva; Jordan – Civil Status and Passport Department, Embassy in Ottawa, Embassy in Washington DC; Migration Policy Institute; UN – Refworld; US – Department of State, Embassy in Amman.