Information on the Partido Nacional Renovador [GTM11657]

Please find attached some documents that provide information on the Partido Nacional Renovador or Partido Nacionalista Renovador (National or Nationalist Renewal Party, PNR). These documents indicate the PNR formed as a splinter group from the Partido Revolucionario (PR) or the Movimiento de Liberaci├│n Nacional (MLN) in 1970 and was granted legal recognition in 1978 or 1979.

The attached documents describe the party as "moderate," "centrist" and "centre right," with one source stating that "the legal PNR was essentially purchased as a vehicle for the political ambitions of Alejandro Maldonado Aguirre" (Nyrop 1983, 166).

The most recent reference to the PNR found among the available sources indicates that the party ceased to have legal status after failing to obtain the required minimum of 4 percent of the vote in the 1990 elections (Latin American Newsletters 6 Dec. 1990, 2).

Information on attacks or threats against members of the PNR could not be found among the sources currently available to the IRBDC.

References

Latin American Newsletters. 6 December 1990. Latin American Regional Reports: Mexico & Central America. "Serrano and Carpio in January Run-Off." London: Latin American Newsletters.

Nyrop, Richard F., ed. 1983. Area Handbook Series: Guatemala: A Country Study. Washington: American University, Foreign Area Studies.

Attachments

Day, Alan J., ed. 1988. Political Parties of the World. 3rd ed. Chicago: St. James Press, p. 242.

Latin American Newsletters. 6 December 1990. Latin American Regional Reports: Mexico & Central America. "Serrano and Carpio in January Run-Off." London: Latin American Newsletters.

Maol in, Ciar n O., ed. 1985. Latin American Political Movements. London: Longman Publishing Group, p. 148.

Nyrop, Richard F., ed. 1983. Area Handbook Series: Guatemala: A Country Study. Washington: American University, Foreign Area Studies, p. 166.

Painter, James. 1989. Guatemala: False Hope, False Freedom - The Rich, the Poor and the Christian Democrats. London: Catholic Institute for International Relations, pp. 67-68.