List of all known guerilla or paramilitary organizations that are currently active in Argentina (2003) [ARG41134.E]

A list of guerrilla or paramilitary organizations that are currently active in Argentina could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

However, Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002 reports that the "Triborder area (TBA) -- where Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay converge -- has long been characterized as a regional hub for Hizballah and Hamas fundraising activites" (30 Apr. 2003). Furthermore, this report states that "[a]lthough there were numerous media reports in 2002 of an al-Qaida presence in the TBA, these reports remained uncorroborated by intelligence and law-enforcement officials" (Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002 30 Apr. 2003). According to the Asia Times, Argentinian officials reported that the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Columbia, FARC) were present in some provinces of the country (Asia Times 31 Jan. 2002). No other recent references to terrorist, guerrilla or paramilitary groups reportedly active in Argentina could be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate.

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum. Please find below the list of additional sources consulted in researching this Information Request.

References


Asia Times. 31 January 2002. Pepe Escobar. "The Roving Eye: Argentine Heavy Metal Rocks the Globe." http://www.atimes.com/global-econ/DA31j01.html [Accessed 5 May 2003]

Patterns of Global Terrorism 2002. 30 April 2003. United States Department of State. Washington, DC. http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/pgtrpt/2002/html/19987.htm [Accessed 5 May 2003]

Additional Sources Consulted


Extremist Groups: An International Compilation of Terrorist Organisations, Violent Political Groups and Issue-Oriented Militant Movement. 2002

IRB Databases

Mondes rebelles : guérillas, milices, groupes terroristes. 2001

NEXIS

WNC

Internet sites:

Cartels et guérillas d'Amérique Latine

Center for Latin America

Centre de documentation sur la paix et les conflits

CIA World Factbook

Country Reports 2002

Danish Immigration Service

Dudley Knox Library

Human Rights Watch

Immigration and Nationality Directorate

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

International Crisis Group

Latin America Studies Program

Medias News

Separatist, Para-Military, Intelligence and Political Organisations

Terrorism and Political Violence: An International Bibliography

Terrorist Group Profile

Search engine:

Google

The most recent reference on the situation of persons with disabilities was found in Country Reports 2002. Although much of the section refers to accessibility to buildings and other facilities, an excerpt of the report discussing broader issues, which relate to the treatment and rights of persons with disabilities, is included with this Response.

Argentina has a non-governmental national organization of parents of children with Down's Syndrome, the Asociación Síndrome de Down de la República Argentina (ASDRA), that has been providing support for families of children with Down's Syndrome since 1988 (ASDRA 2003). The organization is located in Buenos Aires and cannot provide direct assistance to persons outside the capital; however, it is linked to more than 50 other organizations throughout Argentina that carry out similar work (ibid.). A listing of Argentine support organizations for specific localities can be found, in Spanish, on the ASDRA Website at www.asdra.com.ar/ infogral/asoc.htm.

ASDRA indicates that it has no special facilities of its own, and that it is essentially a group of volunteers who provide information and moral support to other families who have children with Down's Syndrome and are facing difficult circumstances, including cases in which rights have to be defended (ibid.). ASDRA states that discrimination can be found in many areas, adding that [translation] "social integration and school inclusion are not simple, not easy, and not available to all" (la integración social y la inclusión escolar no es simple, no es fácil, ni está disponible para todos) (ibid.). ASDRA notes that trying to achieve such integration is often "an immense struggle for many families" (significa una lucha inmensa para muchas familias) (ibid.).

ASDRA has published various opinion articles discussing issues related to the situation of families with children who have Down's Syndrome. One of these articles refers to the difficulty of obtaining schooling for children with special education needs (necesidades educativas especiales, or NEE): Special education schooling can be provided from age 3 to 26 years of age but, generally speaking, it is not made readily available by the local education education authorities, and accessing its various stages requires the good will of these authorities and a "stubborn dedication" (tener la piel dura) on the part of the parents (ASDRA Aug. 1999). The article suggests that the situation can vary depending on the district, city or province (ibid.).

Another article refers to common stereotypes of persons with Down's Syndrome, based on widespread ignorance (ibid. Apr. 1999). Among these, the article mentions the notion that persons with Down's Syndrome are "eternal children" (niños eternos) or innocent and devoid of malice (ángeles inocentes), and it refers to others' condescending, if well-intentioned, pity (ibid.). A third article refers to the differences in parents' attitude to having a child with Down's Syndrome. It states that although the child can impose a permanent economic burden and a demand for continuous attention, he or she can prompt "warmth and solidarity" (calidez y solidaridad) among friends and relatives, and foster contact with other families who can lend their support (ibid. Apr. 2000). However, the article notes that support is important from the first moment the news of having a child with Down's Syndrome is known to the parents, while pointing out that not all health professionals are aware of the importance and existence of support networks (ibid.).

Another support group based in Buenos Aires, the Asociación DOWN de Avellaneda, refers to its own efforts to enable school integration and employment opportunities for persons with Down's Syndrome (ADA 2003). The group offers various forms of counselling and refers to advice it can provide regarding disability pensions and free public transport passes (ibid.). The group also refers to a need to change societal attitudes and to end discrimination against the disabled (ibid.). However, it provides no further detail on the latter (ibid.).

This Response was prepared after researching publicly accessible information currently available to the Research Directorate within time constraints. This Response is not, and does not purport to be, conclusive as to the merit of any particular claim to refugee status or asylum.

References


Asociación DOWN de Avellaneda (ADA) [Buenos Aires]. 2003. "Asociación DOWN de Avellaneda." http://members.tripod.com/~DOWN_ADA/ [Accessed 15 Apr. 2003]

Asociación Síndrome de Down de la República Argentina (ASDRA) [Buenos Aires]. 2003. "Qué es ASDRA y quiénes la integramos." http://www.asdra.com.ar/qsomos/qsomos.htm [Accessed 15 Apr. 2003]

_____. April 2000. Boletín. No. 35. Victoria Massa de Bulit. "Editoriales3/4La Copa." http:// www.asdra.com.ar/qsomos/editoriales/editorial35.htm [Accessed 15 Apr. 2003]

_____. August 1999. Boletín No. 33. Victoria Massa de Bulit. "Editoriales3/4La Integración de Privilegio." http://www.asdra.com.ar/qsomos/editoriales/editorial33.htm [Accessed 15 Apr. 2003]

_____. April 1999. Boletín. No. 32. "Editoriales3/4El Estereotipo." http://www.asdra.com.ar/qsomos/editoriales/editorial32.htm [Accessed 15 Apr. 2003]

Attachment


Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2002. 31 March 2003. "Argentina." United States Department of State. Washington, DC. Section 5. http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2002/18317.htm [Accessed 14 Apr. 2003]