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GEORGIA

Country Background

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10.2006 - Source: European Centre for Minority Issues

Ukrainians are concentrated in urban centres of Georgia; they make up 0.16% of the population ("Implementing the Framework Convention for the Protection of Minorities in Georgia: A Feasibility Study") [ID 18364]

"According to the 2002 population census, there are 7,039 Ukrainians in Georgia, in other words 0.16% of the total population. Their population has declined very rapidly in recent years; in 1979 there were 45,036 Ukrainians – 0.9% of the population. Today Ukrainians are mainly concentrated in urban centres of Georgia such as Tbilisi and Batumi. There are no special education facilities for them, although the Ukrainian language is taught at the Ukrainian Cultural Centre in Tbilisi and in Sunday schools across Georgia. There are also unions for dance, singing and culture."

Document(s): Open document

10.2006 - Source: European Centre for Minority Issues

The few Jews living in Georgia are concentrated mainly in the urban centres; there is an jewish educational centre and an Open University ("Implementing the Framework Convention for the Protection of Minorities in Georgia: A Feasibility Study") [ID 18365]

"Since 1970 most Georgian Jews have emigrated to Israel. From 28,298 in 1979, the Jewish population of Georgia had fallen to 24,720 by 1989 and to 3,772 by 2002, or 0.09% of the population, according to the relevant population censuses. In 1979, Jews made up 1.4% of the population of Tbilisi, 2.1% of the population of Kutaisi and 7.0% of the population of Oni district. Today the few Jews living in Georgian are concentrated mainly in the urban centres.Despite the small numbers, a large number of privately-funded facilities exist to helpGeorgia’s Jewish community preserve its culture. These include a Jewish day school, alibrary, several Sunday schools for children and adults, and two kindergartens, an educational centre and an Open University supported by the American-Jewish Joint Distribution Centre."

Document(s): Open document

10.2006 - Source: European Centre for Minority Issues

Most Assyrians are located in Tbilisi; they make up 0.08% of the population; 80% of them are Orthodox Christian and 20% are Roman Catholics; there are no Assyrian schools in Georgia; Assyrians have a poor knowledge of Georgian ("Implementing the Framework Convention for the Protection of Minorities in Georgia: A Feasibility Study") [ID 18366]

"According to the 2002 population census, there are 3,299 Assyrians in Georgia or 0.08% of the total population of Georgia. The biggest groups of Assyrians are located in Tbilisi, in Gardabani and in the village of Dzveli Kanda in Mtskheta district. Around 80% of Assyrians are Orthodox Christian (both Georgian and Russian Orthodox) and about 20% are Roman Catholics. The mother tongue of the Assyrians is the Syriac language, which belongs to the Aramaic branch of the family of Semitic languages and has its own highly distinctive Syriac alphabet. Although most Assyrians can speak their own language, only a minority can write it. There are no Assyrian schools in Georgia.The main problem facing the Assyrian community is the fact that they are a smallminority with no kin state outside Georgia and therefore they receive very little materialsupport. West of Tbilisi (for example in the village of Kanda) they face assimilation into the Georgian population as they are surrounded by Georgian communities and many young people no longer know the Assyrian language. In Tbilisi, Rustavi and Gardabani, on the other hand, Assyrians have problems integrating due to their poor knowledge of Georgian."

Document(s): Open document

10.2006 - Source: European Centre for Minority Issues

Udi live only in the village Oktomberi in Kvareli district of Kakheti; their language is a modern descendent of Caucasian Albanian; it is written in its own alphabet ("Implementing the Framework Convention for the Protection of Minorities in Georgia: A Feasibility Study") [ID 18367]

"Other smaller nationalities in Georgia include Roma, Germans, Tatars, Belorussians, Poles, Lithuanians, Czechs, Chechens, Moldovans, Avars and Udi. Of these the Udi are worth a special mention, as their language is a modern descendent of Caucasian Albanian, a language that was written in its own alphabet. The only village in which they inhabit, Oktomberi in Kvareli district of Kakheti, is one of only two villages in the world (the other being Nij in Azerbaijan) where the Udi language is spoken. Both the Udi as a national group and their language are therefore in severe danger of extinction."

Document(s): Open document