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AFGHANISTAN

Human Rights Issues

  Overview Death penalty
  Torture/Ill-treatment Arbitrary detention
  Fair trial Prison conditions
  Demonstrations Ethnic affiliation
  Religious affiliation Political affiliation
  NGOs and Human Rights Defenders Women
  Children/Youth Sexual orientation
  Media/Journalists Military Service/Desertion
  Refugees

11.03.2008 - Source: US Department of State

Reports of abuses by government officials, prison authorities, police chiefs, and tribal leaders ("Country Report on Human Rights Practices 2007") [ID 23654]

"The constitution prohibits such practices; however, there were reports of abuses by government officials, local prison authorities, police chiefs, and tribal leaders. NGOs reported that security forces continued to use excessive force, including beating and torturing civilians. During the year human rights organizations reported that local authorities in Herat, Helmand, Badakhshan, and other locations continued to torture and abuse detainees. Torture and abuse included pulling out fingernails and toenails, burning with hot oil, beatings, sexual humiliation, and sodomy. On March 15, the UN Secretary-General released a report noting that in a significant portion of cases ill-treatment and torture had been used to force confessions, and on September 21, released another report stating that the government must investigate allegations of torture of detainees by authorities, especially by the National Directorate of Security (NDS)."

Document(s): Open document

11.03.2008 - Source: US Department of State

According to a report from AI, prisoners are frequently subjected to torture once transferred to local authority; furthermore, AI received repeated reports of torture and ill-treatment by the National Directorate of Security (NDS); the government rejected the report’s assertions ("Country Report on Human Rights Practices 2007") [ID 23655]

"On November 11, AI released a report stating that prisoners frequently were subject to torture once transferred to local authority. The report documented specific cases of torture and noted that AI received repeated reports from both individuals and international organizations of torture and ill-treatment by the NDS. The government rejected the report's assertions. In 2006 Mohammed Ibrahim Sahdat, a lawyer from the Afghanistan Human Rights Organization, reported the case of Jalaludin, whose home was near the scene of an explosion and whom police accused of having ordered it. Authorities reportedly hung Jalaludin by his feet for 10 hours, beat him, and subjected him to electric shocks. He was later released. There were no further developments in the case."

Document(s): Open document

11.2007 - Source: Austrian Centre for Country of Origin and Asylum Research and Documentation

Illegale und willkürliche Verhaftungen, Haftverlängerungen und Folter durch die Polizei sind verbreitet ("11th European Country of Origin Information Seminar; Vienna, 21 - 22 June 2007; Country Report; Afghanistan") [ID 21955]

"Illegal and arbitrary arrest as well as prolonged detention are common. There is no writ of habeas corpus. There are frequent credible reports of torture by police and National
Directorate of Security (NDS). There is no effective oversight of investigation procedures or detention facilities and conditions. People in “opposition” they are likely to be arbitrarily
detained and tortured if returned."

Document(s): Open document

06.03.2007 - Source: US Department of State

According to reports, local authorities in Herat, Helmand, Badakhshan, and other locations continued to routinely torture and abuse detainees ("Country Report on Human Rights Practices 2006") [ID 19509]

"The law prohibits such practices; however, there were reports of abuses. For example, human rights organizations reported that local authorities in Herat, Helmand, Badakhshan, and other locations continued to routinely torture and abuse detainees. Torture and abuse consisted of pulling out fingernails and toenails, burning with hot oil, beatings, sexual humiliation, and sodomy. Violence and instability due to the insurgency hampered relief and reconstruction efforts in different parts of the country and led to numerous human rights abuses. NGOs reported that security forces continued to use excessive force during their fight against Taliban and al-Qa'ida remnants, including looting, beating, and torturing civilians. Reports of abuse by local commanders continued in Faryab. Villagers in Kata Kala reported local commanders imprisoned and tortured them for 15 days to extort money. Some were beaten and others were locked in dark rooms for hours. Victims were also repeatedly threatened with death if they did not cooperate."

Document(s): Open document